Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/14468
Title: Translation of 'H. contortus' and 'T. colubriformis' from egg to establishment in grazing sheep is unaffected by rainfall timing, rainfall amount and herbage height under conditions of high soil moisture in the Northern Tablelands of NSW
Contributor(s): Saad, Khadijah (author); Kahn, Lewis  (author)orcid ; Walkden-Brown, Steve W  (author)orcid ; Bailey, Justin N (author); Bowers, Sara F (author)
Publication Date: 2013
DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2013.06.003
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/14468
Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at Armidale in the Northern Tablelands of NSW, Australia to determine the effects of simulated rainfall amount (0, 12 and 24 mm), rainfall timing (days -1, 0 and 3 relative to plot contamination) and herbage height (4 and 12 cm), on translation of 'Haemonchus contortus' and 'Trichostrongylus colubriformis' from egg to established stages in grazing sheep under conditions of high soil moisture (22-23%). The experiment was conducted in summer when temperature was not anticipated to be a limiting factor for development success. Development success was assessed using tracer sheep and expressed as percentage recovery of parasitic stages relative to egg output on pasture (translation%). For both species, translation (0.11% 'H. contortus'; 0.55% 'T. colubriformis') was observed in the absence of simulated rainfall and was unaffected by treatment effects of rainfall amount and timing, and herbage height. We suggest that soil moisture (>20%) alone was sufficient to support development and translation (from eggs to parasitic stages in the gut of tracer animals) of these species which contrasts with expectations for development success on dry soils. These findings identify the importance of taking soil moisture into account when predicting the likely effects of rainfall and herbage height on development to L3 and ultimately in predictive epidemiological models of ovine gastrointestinal nematodiasis.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Veterinary Parasitology, 197(1-2), p. 204-211
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Place of Publication: Netherlands
ISSN: 0304-4017
Field of Research (FOR): 070708 Veterinary Parasitology
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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