Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13945
Title: Review of David Barnard-Willis, 'Surveillance and Identity: Discourse, Subjectivity and the State', Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012; viii + 213 pp., ISBN 9781409430728, £55 (hbk)
Contributor(s): Devrim, Devo  (author)
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.1177/1750481313509040b
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13945
Abstract: 'Surveillance and Identity: Discourse, Subjectivity and the State' focuses on surveillance as a socio-political activity that is based on three technological artefacts: hard drives, the personal document shredder, and the credit file. 'Surveillance and Identity' investigates how these technologies are linked to each other in the discourse of surveillance and state. The book aims to answer the following research questions: "what discourses of surveillance are identifiable in the contemporary United Kingdom?, how is the nature of the problem of governance defined in these discourses, what roles or subject positions are made available by discourses of surveillance?, and how is the idea of individual identity articulated within contemporary discourses of surveillance?" (pp. 59-60). In other words, the book is about the politics of technology.
Publication Type: Review
Source of Publication: Discourse & Communication, 8(1), p. 109-111
Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1750-4813
1750-4821
Field of Research (FOR): 200403 Discourse and Pragmatics
200405 Language in Culture and Society (Sociolinguistics)
Socio-Economic Outcome Codes: 950201 Communication Across Languages and Culture
950299 Communication not elsewhere classified
HERDC Category Description: D3 Review of Single Work
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