Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13504
Title: Identifying climate change interpretive communities in a large Australian sample
Contributor(s): Hine, Donald W (author); Reser, Joseph P (author); Phillips, Wendy J (author)orcid ; Cooksey, Ray W (author); Marks, Anthony (author); Nunn, Patrick (author); Watt, Susan E (author)orcid ; Bradley, Graham L (author); Glendon, A Ian (author)
Publication Date: 2013
DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvp.2013.08.006
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13504
Abstract: Australians vary considerably in their beliefs and responses to climate change, and addressing this diversity is an important challenge faced by climate change communicators. This study used audience segmentation analysis to identify the main climate change interpretive communities within Australia. A nationwide sample consisting of 3096 residents (aged 15-108 years, 47% male and 53% female) completed an online survey assessing a broad range of cognitive, affective, and behavioural constructs related to climate change. Latent profile analysis applied to the psychological variables suggested that this Australian sample consists of five distinct interpretive communities: 'Alarmed' (26%), 'Concerned' (39%), 'Uncertain' (14%), 'Doubtful' (12%), and 'Dismissive' (9%). Validation analyses revealed that these groups differed in their: (1) behavioural responses to climate change, (2) consumption of climate change related media, and (3) preferences for energy policies. Recommendations are presented for developing more effective climate change communications by tailoring and targeting communications to specific interpretive communities.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Environmental Psychology, v.36, p. 229-239
Publisher: Academic Press
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1522-9610
0272-4944
Field of Research (FOR): 170113 Social and Community Psychology
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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