Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12558
Title: Nutrient Regulation of Intestinal Development and Function in Chickens
Contributor(s): Iji, Paul (author)
Publication Date: 2012
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12558
Abstract: This review presents an overview of the current state of knowledge of the relationship between intestinal function and nutrients in poultry. There has been limited research on such relationship, especially at the tissue and cellular levels, until recently. Most of the previous studies focused on gross changes in weight and volume. Recently, there has been greater focus on studies into the effects of nutrients on the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), particularly in an effort to find alternatives to in-feed antibiotic (IFA) supplements. There are also studies aimed at alleviating the nature of various anti nutritive factors in feed ingredients and how their effects can be reduced. Although the gross response of poultry to such factors are generally known, it is not certain if these effects originate at the intestinal level or points of metabolism beyond the intestine. The objective of this review is to examine the natural development of gastrointestinal tract and how this responds to various feed factors.
Publication Type: Book Chapter
Source of Publication: Chickens: Physiology, Diseases and Farming Practices, p. 29-50
Publisher: Nova Science Publishers
Place of Publication: New York, United States of America
ISBN: 9781620810446
9781620810279
Field of Research (FOR): 070203 Animal Management
070202 Animal Growth and Development
HERDC Category Description: B1 Chapter in a Scholarly Book
Other Links: http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/163586468
Series Name: Animal Science, Issues and Professions
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Appears in Collections:Book Chapter
School of Environmental and Rural Science

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