Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12039
Title: Bearing the Brunt: Co-workers' Experiences of Work Reintegration Processes
Contributor(s): Dunstan, Debra  (author)orcid ; MacEachen, Ellen (author)
Publication Date: 2013
DOI: 10.1007/s10926-012-9380-2
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12039
Abstract: Purpose: Work disability research has found co-worker support to be a significant but under-recognised aspect of work reintegration (WR) processes. Although co-workers work alongside returning workers, their practical contribution to WR success or failure is often invisible to others. This study aimed to gain further insight into the role and contribution of co-workers in WR interventions. Method An exploratory qualitative pilot study was conducted in Toronto, Canada in 2011. Three focus groups were conducted with 13 co-workers, recruited for their direct experience of 'working alongside' a returning worker. An iterative data gathering and analysis process occurred. Themes were generated from categories in open-ended interview questions and new issues arising from the data. Findings The findings detail co-workers' practical experiences of WR processes and their reflections on social and work conditions that impacted their participation. Co-workers' capacity to support returning workers was related to the quality of the WR arrangements, the relationship with the returning worker, work culture, and the duration of the required support. Workplace privacy and confidentiality requirements were identified as a key challenge for co-worker participation. The effects on co-workers of WR processes ranged from the opportunity to learn new skills to disillusionment and withdrawal from the workplace. In worst case scenarios, 'ripple effects' including emotional distress, physical injury and termination of co-workers' employment had occurred. Conclusion Co-workers are not a neutral party in WR procedures. Formalizing the co-worker role to include communication, consideration and recognition might improve co-workers' WR experiences.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 23(1), p. 44-54
Publisher: Springer New York LLC
Place of Publication: United States of America
ISSN: 1053-0487
1573-3688
Field of Research (FOR): 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO): 920505 Occupational Health
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Psychology

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