Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/11380
Title: An Australian Perspective on Researching and Supporting Low-Achieving Students in the Middle School Grades: The QUICKSMART Intervention
Contributor(s): Bellert, Anne Maree (author); Graham, Lorraine (author); Pegg, John Edward  (author)
Publication Date: 2005
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/11380
Abstract: This paper begins with a brief overview of current learning disability definitions and support structures in schools in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The paper will then explore the development of a research-based intervention, described under the generic name of QuickSmart, designed to improve basic academic skills in reading and numeracy for students' with learning disabilities. The intervention features the Computerized Academic Assessment System (CAAS) developed at the Laboratory for the Assessment and Training of Academic Skills (LATAS) at the University of Massachusetts. The intervention draws on theory and research in the fields of education and psychology, focusing on learning disabilities, modularity theory, developing automaticity, the role of working memory and a heirarchical view of students' learning of academic skills. Additionally, the structured approach of QuickSmart, with its appropriate use of technology and an emphasis placed on both practice and strategy instruction, is very much in tune with how many teachers consider students with learning difficulties can be usefully supported. The QuickSmart intervention has been developed and implemented over the last four years, with over 150 middle grades (Years 5-8) student participants, in 15 schools in rural New South Wales. The studies conducted to date have investigated the effects of improved automaticity of basic academic skills on higher order processes such as comprehension and problem solving. Results of the research, coming from a variety of sources, indicate that students' improvement in information retrieval times and accuracy in basic academic skills can lead to subsequent gains on tasks which target higher order thinking skills.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: EARLI 2005: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 11th Biennial Meeting - Integrating Multiple Perspectives on Effective Learning Environments, Nicosia, Cyprus, 23rd - 27th August, 2005
Conference Details: EARLI 2005: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction 11th Biennial Meeting - Integrating Multiple Perspectives on Effective Learning Environments, Nicosia, Cyprus, 23rd - 27th August, 2005
Source of Publication: 11th European Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction Abstracts, p. 1063-1063
Publisher: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI)
Place of Publication: online
Field of Research (FOR): 130312 Special Education and Disability
Socio-Economic Outcome Codes: 930299 Teaching and Instruction not elsewhere classified
HERDC Category Description: E3 Extract of Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://www.earli.org/resources/ABSTRACTS%20Nicosia%202005.pdf
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The National Centre of Science, Information and Communication Technology, and Mathematics Education for Rural and Regional Australia (SiMERR)

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