Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/11073
Title: Importance of drinking water temperature for managing heat stress in sheep
Contributor(s): Savage, Darryl  (author); Nolan, John Vivian  (author)orcid ; Godwin, Ian Robert  (author); Aoetpah, Aholiab (author); Nguyen, Thanh (author); Baillie, Neil (author); Lawlor, Craig  (author)
Publication Date: 2007
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/11073
Abstract: Australian sheep are transported to the Middle East where excessive temperatures (>45°C) can cause heat stress and inappetence, compromising the welfare of animals in the post-discharge phase of an industry worth $1.8 billion annually (Hassall and Associates 2006). There is little published research on the importance of drinking water temperature in managing heat stress in sheep. There are also no recommendations. Recommended water temperatures for cattle in hot climates are 16 to 18°C (EA Systems 2004). This study found that as drinking water was increased from 20°C to 40°C water intake increased and that sheep prefer to drink water of 30°C rather than 20°C in hot climates. These are new findings with important implications for the industry.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: Agribusiness Livestock Updates 2007, Perth, Australia, 24th - 25th July, 2007
Conference Details: Agribusiness Livestock Updates 2007, Perth, Australia, 24th - 25th July, 2007
Source of Publication: Agribusiness Livestock Updates Papers (Meat Quality)
Publisher: Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia
Place of Publication: online
Field of Research (FOR): 070299 Animal Production not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: E1 Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/content/aap/heat_stress_savage.pdf
http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/PC_91959.html?s=1625153328
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