Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10990
Title: Social recognition and approach in the chick: lateralization and effect of visual experience
Contributor(s): Deng, Chao (author); Rogers, Lesley (author)
Publication Date: 2002
DOI: 10.1006/anbe.2001.1942
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10990
Abstract: Chicks, 'Gallus gallus domesticus', tested monocularly on day 3 after hatching recognize familiar versus unfamiliar conspecifics and choose to approach one or other when they use the left eye, whereas they approach familiar and unfamiliar chicks at random when they use the right eye. In experiment 1 we investigated the effects of light exposure of embryos prior to hatching on this particular form of lateralization. Irrespective of whether they hatched from eggs incubated in the dark or from eggs exposed to light during the final days of incubation, chicks using the left eye had higher choice scores (meaning they chose to approach either a familiar or an unfamiliar chick) than chicks using the right eye or both eyes. Therefore, light experience prior to hatching did not influence the lateralization of individual recognition or choice behaviour, although it did affect latency to move out of, and time spent in, the centre of the runway. Experiment 2 showed that visual/social experience posthatching influences choice behaviour: chicks housed in a group in the light for 12 h on day 1 posthatching made a clear choice between familiar and unfamiliar chicks when tested on day 3, but chicks kept in a group in the dark on day 1 did not make a choice, instead alternating between the two stimuli. In experiment 3 we found that posthatching visual/social experience increased the choice scores of chicks using the right eye and thereby removed any lateralization of choice behaviour. The results suggest that visual experience of a social group is required before chicks using their right eye (and left hemisphere) will pay attention to the cues that distinguish one chick from another. Chicks using their left eye (and right hemisphere) recognize the difference between individuals without requiring visual experience with other chicks. Copyright 2002 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Animal Behaviour, 63(0), p. 697-706
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Place of Publication: London, England
ISSN: 0003-3472
1095-8282
Field of Research (FOR): 060801 Animal Behaviour
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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