Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10207
Title: Global feed supply and demand
Contributor(s): Swick, Robert A (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2011
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10207
Abstract: As governments around the world have mandated the use of corn, sorghum, wheat, soybean oil and rapeseed oil to produce biofuel, the prices of these commodities have become correlated with the price of petroleum. Use of biofuel limits dependence on imported petroleum and also reduces emissions of greenhouse gases as these fuels are renewable. Meanwhile, the overall demand for these crops for food and feed continues to rise with increasing global population and affluence. World population is expected to increase from 7 to 9 billion people by 2050. To date, agricultural production has kept pace with demand. Plantings and yields have increased substantially over the past 50 years in most regions of the world. Corn yields in the USA increased from 2 mt/ha/yr in 1950 to more than 10 mt/ha/yr in 2009. Traditional genetic improvement, irrigation, use of fertilizers and chemicals, farming practices and genetic modification have all worked in tandem to improve yields. About one-third of corn produced in the USA is currently converted to ethanol; the remainder is used as domestic and international animal feed and for corn sugar production. The EU has mandated that 10% of energy used for transportation will be achieved from agriculture by 2020. Grain and oilseed consumption for animal feed continue to increase every year. Prices for energy-rich feed grains will likely continue to increase in the future. Feed conversion efficiency has improved with advances in animal genetics and ingredient processing. Rapid nutrient measurement techniques using near infra-red reflectance spectrometry and net energy diet formulation promise to further enhance efficiency.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: 22nd Biennial Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition - Australia Conference, Armidale, Australia, 13th - 15th July, 2011
Source of Publication: Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition - Australia, v.18, p. 1-7
Publisher: University of New England
Place of Publication: Armidale, Australia
ISSN: 0819-4823
Field of Research (FOR): 070204 Animal Nutrition
140201 Agricultural Economics
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: E1 Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://raan.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Recent-Advances-in-Animal-Nutrition-Australia-Vol-18-2011.pdf
Series Name: Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition in Australia
Series Number : 18
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