Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10049
Title: Left-right asymmetries of behaviour and nervous system in invertebrates
Contributor(s): Frasnelli, Elisa (author); Vallortigara, Giorgio (author); Rogers, Lesley (author)
Publication Date: 2012
DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2012.02.006
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/10049
Abstract: Evidence of left-right asymmetries in invertebrates has begun to emerge, suggesting that lateralization of the nervous system may be a feature of simpler brains as well as more complex ones. A variety of studies have revealed sensory and motor asymmetries in behaviour, as well as asymmetries in the nervous system, in invertebrates. Asymmetries in behaviour are apparent in olfaction (antennal asymmetries) and in vision (preferential use of the left or right visual hemifield during activities such as foraging or escape from predators) in animals as different as bees, fruitflies, cockroaches, octopuses, locusts, ants, spiders, crabs, snails, water bugs and cuttlefish. Asymmetries of the nervous system include lateralized position of specific brain structures (e.g., in fruitflies and snails) and of specific neurons (e.g., in nematodes). As in vertebrates, lateralization can occur both at the individual and at the population-level in invertebrates. Theoretical models have been developed supporting the hypothesis that the alignment of the direction of behavioural and brain asymmetries at the population-level could have arisen as a result of social selective pressures, when individually asymmetrical organisms had to coordinate with each other. The evidence reviewed suggests that lateralization at the population-level may be more likely to occur in social species among invertebrates, as well as vertebrates.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 36(4), p. 1273-1291
Publisher: Pergamon
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1873-7528
0149-7634
Field of Research (FOR): 060801 Animal Behaviour
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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